PURGATORIO: WALKING FOR WAITING FOR GODOT

PURGATORIO: WALKING FOR WAITING FOR GODOT

Sat 18th, Sun 19th August 2018
MARBLE ARCH CAVES UNESCO GLOBAL GEOPARK, Fermanagh
outdoor event |

PURGATORIO: WALKING FOR WAITING FOR GODOT

 

Tragi-Comedy for the Border

LOCATION: Marble Arch Caves UNESCO Global Geo-park

PICK UP POINT: Enniskillen Castle Museum Car Park

DATES:
Saturday 18th August, 10am
Sunday 19th August, 10am

(All performances necessitate walking from 8am or before)

TICKETS: £15

EVENT NOTES
Audience should meet outside the Castle Museum bus lay by 8am and will be driven to the location (20 mins drive).
On arrival at location, the walk follows an uphill path with an average 30 degree climb gradient, through a beautiful meadow and up around a hillside overlooking a deep glen to come out on a summit of upland moorland where the path then bends round until you reach a gate by the Pollinska pothole with a running stream beyond which Tree for Waiting for Godot by Antony Gormley will stand at the end of the path.
At this point you are standing precisely on the Irish border with a 360 degree moorland around you including Cuilcagh mountain in the backdrop.
Please note:
Audience should wear appropriate walking gear, sturdy walking boots and layers.
Whilst the walk is mainly on a pathway, it is uneven underfoot and does get progressively steeper.
Please bring suitable water and snacks to replenish your energy.

A Country Road.  A Mountain.  A Tree.  Morning.

It arrives at the custom-house as it were, with no luggage, no passport and nothing to declare yet it gets through, as might a pilgrim from Mars…’  Kenneth Tynan on Waiting for Godot, Observer 1953.

IN ‘WAITING FOR GODOT’ it is usually the characters of the play, Vladimir and Estragon who do the walking and suffer sore feet for their troubles but in this unique site-specific Godot it is the audience who walk, through the Marble Arch Caves UNESCO Global Geo-park (the first transnational geopark in the world), through the existential Beckettian landscape, to gather at the Irish border around Antony Gormley’s Tree for Waiting for Godot (specially installed for the occasion) for a rehearsed reading of the play.

This is participatory, experiential drama at its most extreme and on the last Happy Days before Brexit the festival is culturally occupying the border with a quintessentially Irish play that nonetheless has universal appeal, whose themes could not be more relevant to our times – themes of waiting, of the sense of the days repeating themselves, of despair, of pathos, of homelessness, but all of this lifted by the hopefulness of great art.

The Festival presents its first Waiting for Godot in English, subsequent to previously presented productions from The Berliner Ensemble in German Warten Auf Godot directed by George Tabori (2015), Theatre Nono in French En Attendant Godot (2014) and New York New Yiddish Rep in Yiddish Wartn Af Godot (2013).

This site-specific Godot is a sequel to the Dante-inspired Inferno (2013).